on goodness

The past two evenings I performed on a Third Angle New Music studio series concert called “A Family Affair”. It was a concert centered around one of my colleagues in the ensemble (and in the Oregon Symphony), cellist Marilyn De Oliveira. Marilyn is quite a remarkable human being. She is one of the few people I know who is almost relentlessly positive in her outlook, regardless of what is happening both inside her life and in the outside world. She describes herself – somewhat ruefully – as a pollyanna. She is also, perhaps because of this worldview, a tremendous advocate for music to everyone. She, as she put it at a Q&A session last night, was brought up with the view that music has an incredible capacity to bring joy to every single person who encounters it. She is, quite honestly, a musical evangelical. And she’s one of those advocates who doesn’t tell you why music is good for you, she just, by her way of being and inhabiting the music, makes you also want to hear more, do more, maybe even learn more about music.

It’s so admirable, what Marilyn embodies. The audience at the concerts this week were also completely rapt in their attention to what Marilyn and her band of friends and family presented. It’s a rare thing, to be on the receiving end of that sort of audience focus. There really was a give and take that one always hopes for, but seldom gets in larger scale performances in the concert hall. For chamber musicians it’s more common to encounter, but these shows were at a level of interchange between audience and musicians that was way up in the 99th percentile. I’ll close by saying a heartfelt thank you to Marilyn for her musical kinship and friendship these past few years, and for inviting me to perform with her this week. It was a career highlight for me.

Obrigado, Marilyn!

Program:

CAROLINE SHAW | limestone & felt (2012)
JOHN TAVENER | Akhmatova Songs (1993)
ANDY AKIHO | 21 (2009)
SVANTE HENRYSON | Off Pist (1996)
KENJI BUNCH | Adventure Awaits (2017)
Commissioned with support from The Collins Foundation
GIOVANNI SOLLIMA | Lamentatio (1998)

Performers:
Marilyn de Oliveira, cello
Edlyn de Oliveira, soprano
Trevor Fitzpatrick, cello
Charles Noble, viola
Michael Roberts, percussion
James Shields, clarinet

Super Bowl Whining?

The following thoughts were posted by violist-composer Kenji Bunch on his Facebook page this morning. They were written in response to his timeline full of classical musicians complaining about the Super Bowl 50 halftime show. I think that what Kenji says is right on point.

For my classical friends who were disappointed/offended/alienated/etc. by Coldplay’s show yesterday, specifically the way the YOLA students were incorporated into it, here are a few thoughts:

1. Commercial music and musicians are with us, not against us. Composers’ royalties are subsidized by their revenue, orchestral seasons are aided by Pops ticket sales, film scores remain an important entry point for many people into our little world. Though their training and techniques may differ from us, musicians working in this field usually like, respect, and admire us “serious” musicians. Why then, do we self-servingly anticipate “classical music’s big moment” at the Super Bowl only to deride the band that graciously created the opportunity and bemoan their misuse of the great maestro Dudamel? Just as we snarkily complain about Taylor Swift’s lack of “real” musical talent, until she donates thousands of dollars to our orchestras. It’s like we want to have our cake and refuse to eat it because we’re gluten free, too.

2. You don’t own your instrument. I mean, of course you probably do own the particular one you use professionally, but my point is this: you represent merely a brief moment in time within the lifespan of your instrument and for the continuum of history in which it travels. You’ve no doubt worked hard for a long time and made many sacrifices for the study of your craft- I have, too- no one denies that. And if you choose to dress up like a footman from Downton Abbey, sit down and read sheet music on a stand when you perform, and include your audience in the experience only by standing up to acknowledge them at the end of said performance when you allow them to applaud your work, that’s fine.

But if a group of young, colorfully outfitted Latino musicians play those same instruments while smiling, dancing, and perform a memorized version of a soaringly orchestrated pop song for millions of viewers worldwide, it’s also fine, and it’s also classical music. And it’s also quite possible they’ve just done more in a few minutes for the future of your instrument than many of us will ever do in our lifetimes.

Are jealousy and bitterness the best way to respond to this notion, or could it be possible that we should simply thank these beautiful kids and the folks who gave them this platform? I dunno.

another crisis article – where are the solution articles?

newrepPhilip Kennicott has his first new article in three years up over at the New Republic, and it’s a doozy. It ostensibly covers the 2013 edition of the annual meeting of the League of American Orchestras (the management counterpart to the International Conference of Symphony and Opera Musicians, or ICSOM) [full disclosure, I serve as the webmaster for ICSOM]. Curiously, the lede concerns the Nashville Symphony’s recent financial woes (including the near foreclosure and auction of its new concert hall) and predicts “complex and rancorous negotiations” with the musicians. This about a week after a tentative agreement was reached in Nashville. Surely this could have been edited for the online edition (I would assume the print edition went to press at least a month ago). Continue reading “another crisis article – where are the solution articles?”