Tag Archives: third angle new music

*Third Angle: 99 Bottles of Beer on the Wohl

Join Third Angle and LA-based composer Daniel Wohl for an evening of electronic music, snacks, and brews!  Come and listen to Wohl’s music, drink some tasty Lagunitas beer, and eat some delicious snacks courtesy of Altabira City Tavern.  The $25 ticket price includes snacks and two beers, and we hope you can join us for this up close and personal event.

Want to take a deeper dive into Wohl’s music? For the most fulfilling experience, we encourage you to attend this party as well as the Holographic concert.

Third Angle New Music: World of Ideas

Susan Smith performs brilliant new works for solo piano by David Lang, Timo Andres, and Portland’s Michael Johanson.

Works:
LANG | Memory Pieces
JOHANSON | Rhapsody
ANDRES | How can I live in your world of ideas?

Third Angle New Music: World of Ideas

Susan Smith performs brilliant new works for solo piano by David Lang, Timo Andres, and Portland’s Michael Johanson.

Works:
LANG | Memory Pieces
JOHANSON | Rhapsody
ANDRES | How can I live in your world of ideas?

three quartets, one steve reich

This past Friday and Saturday nights, I, as part of the Third Angle String Quartet played all three of Steve Reich’s works for string quartet. Reich, regarded by some as this country’s greatest living composer, turns 80 years old on October 3rd, and ensembles across the world are paying tribute with myriad performances of his works. This is the latest in a series of remarkable concert experiences that I’ve been fortunate to have with Third Angle. Being able to immerse oneself in the music of a single composer for an extended period is always a rewarding experience – insights into the composer’s language come with increasing frequency, and the dividends paid accrue more quickly than playing a work in isolation. That’s why I’ve long suggested that any orchestral musician worth their salt should play chamber music by the major symphonists as part of their musical continuing education.

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Violinist Greg Ewer gets ‘into’ his subject.

Triple the Quartet

The quartets we played – Triple Quartet (1998), WTC 9/11 (2010), and Different Trains (1988), each present different challenges to the performer. Triple is the most rhythmically challenging, and in spite of its fast-slow-fast movement tempo structure, really fells like a moto perpetuo all the way through. It demands so much concentration – it feels like a high wire (sans net) act for its entire duration. Playing with not just one, but two other pre-recorded quartet tracks presents a unique challenge to one used to playing a lot of chamber music – the reactive element is very much truncated, because there is a tiny bit of latitude with tempo. The pre-recorded tracks are implacable, immoveable, relentless. But there is so much vitality in this piece! It explodes off the starting block with tremendous energy, then subsiding into a slow, raga-esque burn in the second movement, and then catapulting itself the the end with a marvel of a gradual rhythmic and dynamic crescendo. In many ways, it’s the most conventional of the three quartets, one that Beethoven would probably understand at a basic level of construction.

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Cellist Marilyn De Oliveira and violist Charles Noble working the soundcheck on Friday afternoon.

Distilling the Horror

WTC 9/11 is such a difficult work. The subject matter, and the use of the archival recordings and interviews, and just the opening sound of the off-the-hook phone warning tones, places one firmly back in those horrible events of September 11, 2001. It was a work that was difficult to work on at home, playing with the soundtrack, on bright, early September days. So many images came to mind, unbidden, and lingered on. The phrases: “help me, I can’t breathe!”, “people – jumping from the building”, “Hashem yishmor tzaytcha uvoecha may atah va-ahd olahm” (Psalm 121:8 – The Eternal will guard your departure and your arrival from now till the end of time.) So appropriate that we performed this piece on the eve of Rosh Hashana. The first night, you could practically feel the air go out of the room as the piece began. The level of intensity from the audience was something that I’ve only experienced a few times in my performing career, and it was astonishing. The fact that we were in a large space (the Oregon Rail Heritage Center), with enormous locomotives surrounding us on all sides, and with the industrial smell of all the bits and lubricants that keep those huge beasts in running order, also provided a sensory echo of that day fifteen years ago – imagined cavernous spaces where wreckage and materials were stored and examined for years afterward. With a piece such as WTC 9/11,  it’s hard to separate the musical work from the circumstances of its creation, and that seems entirely appropriate here. A work about one of the most terrible days in our modern history, written by a composer who lived four blocks from Ground Zero, and which melds the worst of humanity with a deeply-held religious faith in what is to come – is sheer genius, magical, even as it is evocative of horror beyond imagining. And the long minute of held-breath at the end before the audience allowed itself to reluctantly applaud, equally magical.

Steve Reich | Photo: Jeffrey Herman

Steve Reich | Photo: Jeffrey Herman

Trains (and trains)

The final work on the program, Different Trains, is one of Reich’s most famous pieces, and deservedly so. It is an unqualified masterpiece. Performing it in the midst of giant locomotives of exactly the type that may have propelled Reich on his childhood journeys across the US (from New York to Los Angeles and back again) was an unforgettable experience for us. For me, the echoes (foreshadowing?) of snippets from WTC 9/11 resonated as the rehearsal and performing periods went on: the shriek of the train whistles vs. the sounds of emergency sirens; the phrase “New York” used chillingly in both pieces; the plaintive cadences of the vocal samples “they shaved us”, “the bodies”. There were points in this piece that were so exhilarating, that I found it impossible not to grin. And there were places where it was so heartbreaking to play (and Reich gives some of the best vocal work to the viola in this quartet). People give ‘minimalism’ a bad rap, and I find it hard to understand why. Certainly, it is not all created equal, but Reich’s music has enormous emotional resonance and vitality that is undeniable, and which accounts for its great popularity. There really is nothing ‘minimal’ about it.

Supporting players in name only

I must give credit to the crew of “Team Third Angle”: the indefatigable Lisa Volle, executive director; Ron Blessinger, artistic director and violinist; Evan Lewis, communications coordinator – they made a technical and logistical nightmare seem trivial to navigate. And incredible kudos to Branic Howard, our incredible sound engineer for the concerts. Literally, the evening wouldn’t have been possible without his artistry and technical knowledge!

Third Angle – Different Trains

Third Angle presents an 80th birthday tribute to Steve Reich, often called the world’s greatest living composer. The program features all three of Reich’s string quartets in a unique setting at the Oregon Rail Heritage Center.

Works:
REICH | Different Trains
REICH | Triple Quartet*
REICH | WTC 9/11

*Oregon premiere

Performers:
Ron Blessinger, violin
Greg Ewer, violin
Charles Noble, viola
Marilyn de Oliveira, cello

Supported by:
Diana & Lauretta Burman
The M.E.N.S.C.H. Fund

Third Angle – Different Trains

Third Angle presents an 80th birthday tribute to Steve Reich, often called the world’s greatest living composer. The program features all three of Reich’s string quartets in a unique setting at the Oregon Rail Heritage Center.

Works:
REICH | Different Trains
REICH | Triple Quartet*
REICH | WTC 9/11

*Oregon premiere

Performers:
Ron Blessinger, violin
Greg Ewer, violin
Charles Noble, viola
Marilyn de Oliveira, cello

Supported by:
Diana & Lauretta Burman
The M.E.N.S.C.H. Fund

there was joy in mudville that night

Even as darkness fell, our fans remained! Photo: Stephanie Kramer

Even as darkness fell, our fans remained! Photo: Stephanie Kramer

Last night, the Oregon Symphony played its annual Waterfront Concert at Tom McCall Waterfront Park in downtown Portland. It is the first year that rain has struck the event with any degree of severity. We’ve had some stray sprinkles here and there, but not the out and out deluge that descended upon us Thursday evening.

The Waterfront Concert is always such a fun way to start the season. It’s free to everyone, so we get big crowds – up to 20,000 or so. This year the dire forecast did cut down the attendance somewhat, but we still had thousands brave the elements, and those who did not come down in person were able to listen to the live broadcast of the concert on AllClassical Portland 89.9 on the radio and via web stream.

Much of the day was overcast and blustery, with the rain starting to move in during the afternoon’s set of performances by local arts ensembles. My concert with the Third Angle Quartet at 2:00 was dry, but FearNoMusic didn’t fare as well during their performance at 3:00, when the mist moved in to make everything damp, in spite of the canopy over the side stage area. There was no steady rain in the afternoon, but the portent was set for the rest of the day.

The main event started dry enough, with enough wind present to make my job as page turner more involved than usual. About the time we started the Mozart symphony, the rain really started, and then began to absolutely pour. A few of our less prepared audience members made a run for it at that point, but they were small in number. Most everyone else remained, opened their umbrellas and put on their ponchos, and stayed for the duration.

Can I just say at this point how impressed the orchestra was by our fabulous Oregonian fans? We think that you were all rock stars! It warmed our hearts to see all of you braving the rain and damp and mud to listen to us perform. You have our enduring admiration and respect!

We got to the Bizet, selections from the L’Arlésienne Suite, which featured principal players of the Metropolitan Youth Symphony playing alongside the OSO principals, and there was a brief pow-wow at the changeover in which it was decided to cut several numbers and proceed to the 1812 Overture finale. Norman Huynh made his excellent debut as our new Assistant conductor in music from John Williams’ score to E.T., and then the Portland Youth Philharmonic principals joined us for their side-by-side for the Tchaikovsky 1812 Overture. The rain began to taper during the performance, leaving it safe for us to get our instruments to the backstage tents without incident as the fireworks display commenced. We were sorry to miss our collaboration with the dancers of Oregon Ballet Theatre (Tchaikovsky Serenade), but it would not have been safe for them to dance on a wet stage. We’ll look forward to playing with them again next August!

All in all, it was a dramatic and different Waterfront Concert, but still very rewarding and fun for all!

 

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